Givers get as much as they give.

A lot of people do not recognize this for how powerful it is.  But the power of giving, when it comes from a place of abundance, actually creates more to be given.

Pathwalking is about finding the path for ourselves.  Taking control over our own individual destiny, making use of conscious reality creation to manifest the life we desire to live.

One of the key reasons behind Pathwalking, at least for me, is to make the best use of the skills I have.  I want to use my talents not only as a writer, but as an empathic intuitive to do some really cool things.

As such, there is a lot of giving involved in this.  I don’t just want to do the things I want to do for myself.  I want to share them.  To be a giver, I want to put myself out there to do what I can to make the world a better place.

We are living in particularly trying times.  There is a constant, seemingly never-ending flood of negativity, lack, and artificial competition washing over us through social media.  Resisting and countering this can be trying at best, and sometimes utterly exhausting.

Paulo Coelho wrote a book called Warrior of the Light.  I cannot recommend this book enough (alongside The Alchemist, which is one of my very favorite books).  The notion of a Warrior of the Light is very similar to Pathwalking.  It is full of anecdotes for how to achieve our individual destinies, and do good in the world.

I have often written about how Pathwalking is not a selfish act.  To properly define this, it is necessary to understand the fundamental difference between a giver and a taker.

What’s the difference between a giver and a taker?

I mentioned this briefly in this week’s Positivity post, but it totally bears repeating.  A giver will give their time, their energy, their assistance from a place of openness, abundance and a desire to make a difference.  This is sometimes great, and sometimes small.

A taker, on the other hand, takes the time, energy and assistance from others and hoards it.  They express no gratitude, and expect you to give them more and more, with little or no thought about anyone but themselves.  They also generally believe in lack, and that there is not enough to share with anyone else.  If they do give, they do so expecting something in return.

To be a giver requires a lot less than most people think.  Smile at a stranger.  Hold a door.  Let that guy into your lane on the road.  Seemingly insignificant bits, perhaps, but they add up, and they build positivity.  They also feel good to do.

Some takers are unintentional.  Upbringing, poor examples, various and sundry other issues.  Most, because they believe there is finite amounts of most things, take and hoard because they believe that if they don’t, there won’t be enough.  Takers are usually selfish.

This is why Pathwalking is not a selfish act.  Most of the people seeking to walk their own path in life and consciously create their own reality, are givers.  Why?  Because working in the here-and-now, as Pathwalking frequently requires, makes us more aware.  When we are aware, we see our impact on other people.  To manifest abundance, we need to think, feel and act on abundance.  This, frankly, makes us a giver.

Further, by giving, we tell the Universe that we believe there is more-than-enough.  A giver expresses their belief that because of the abundance in the Universe, you can share.

Being a giver is both tangible and intangible.

There are many tangible things we can give people.  Hugs, money, and numerous other items.  Most giving, frankly, is intangible.  Smiles, ideas, a shoulder to cry on, and so forth.

A lot of people see selflessness as this enormous, grandiose gesture.  The thing is, it can be.  But for the most part, it’s little things.  Being selfless means being a giver, and that takes much less than people realize.

My friend needs help researching something.  I provide a contact to someone with the knowledge to help.  A loved one needs to vent about a situation.  I call, and we talk.  You, like me, are trying to manifest your destiny.  I share my struggles and my path to help you work on yours. In all of these scenarios, I am not asking for anything in return.  There are no conditions associated with what I do.  This is what being a giver is all about.

This is one of the biggest and most important differences between a giver and a taker, the selfless and the selfish.  A giver seeks nothing in return.  A taker expects something for anything they give.  The selfless person gives because it feels good to give.  The selfish person might give, but they do so to prop themselves up somehow, and do so to gain something in return.

It is important, however, to recognize the difference between giving and sacrificing.  Giving is from a place of abundance, and is about sharing plenty.  Sacrificing is from a place of lack, and is about going without in order to let another have something.  Sacrificing is nearly as unhealthy at being a taker.  Sure, you give, but you then go without because you think there isn’t enough.  Going without to give is not healthy giving.

A giver recognizes an abundant universe.

I give because I believe that there is plenty where that comes from.  Whatever it is, tangible or intangible, giving makes me feel good.  It is a lot easier to find and walk any given path when I can share my work on it.  That is a big part of what giving is all about.

Givers get as much, maybe even more, as they give.

What do you do to be a giver?

 

This is the three-hundred-twelfth entry in my series. These weekly posts are ideas for, and my personal experiences with, walking along the path of life.  I share this journey as part of my desire to make a difference in this world along the way.

Thank you for joining me.  Feel free to re-blog and share.

The first year of Pathwalking, including some expanded ideas, is available here.

If you enjoy Pathwalking, you may also want to read my Five Easy Steps to Change the World for the Better.

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